Alice Trueman - all messages by user

8/2/2004 11:04:34 AM
Knitting Retreats Hi
Sounds like you had a wonderful time on Mull, Jean.
I`m playing with the idea of organizing a knitting retreat in Scotland, Wales, or England, maybe Ireland, down the way. Probably wouldn`t be until 2006. Knitters at this year`s June retreat were quite interested.
Idea would be to rent a country house/ manor house/ castle and have 12 to 15 knitters for a week. This year`s cook jumped at the possibility of going - her husband is willing to clean bathrooms, do laundry, and generally work his butt off, for his airfare (carrot is they get extended plane tickets). This would give quality control rather than relying on someone`s Aunt Gertie and her cousin. It would be the June retreat format, with accommodation, meals, tuition, outings, all-inclusive once knitters arrived on site, or at the closest rail station, ferry dock, or bus stop.

DD and I are thinking of going to look-over suitable old houses after we graduate next spring.

Any interest? Comments?

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 11:04:34 AM
Knitting Retreats Hi
Sounds like you had a wonderful time on Mull, Jean.
I`m playing with the idea of organizing a knitting retreat in Scotland, Wales, or England, maybe Ireland, down the way. Probably wouldn`t be until 2006. Knitters at this year`s June retreat were quite interested.
Idea would be to rent a country house/ manor house/ castle and have 12 to 15 knitters for a week. This year`s cook jumped at the possibility of going - her husband is willing to clean bathrooms, do laundry, and generally work his butt off, for his airfare (carrot is they get extended plane tickets). This would give quality control rather than relying on someone`s Aunt Gertie and her cousin. It would be the June retreat format, with accommodation, meals, tuition, outings, all-inclusive once knitters arrived on site, or at the closest rail station, ferry dock, or bus stop.

DD and I are thinking of going to look-over suitable old houses after we graduate next spring.

Any interest? Comments?

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 11:04:34 AM
Knitting Retreats Hi
Sounds like you had a wonderful time on Mull, Jean.
I`m playing with the idea of organizing a knitting retreat in Scotland, Wales, or England, maybe Ireland, down the way. Probably wouldn`t be until 2006. Knitters at this year`s June retreat were quite interested.
Idea would be to rent a country house/ manor house/ castle and have 12 to 15 knitters for a week. This year`s cook jumped at the possibility of going - her husband is willing to clean bathrooms, do laundry, and generally work his butt off, for his airfare (carrot is they get extended plane tickets). This would give quality control rather than relying on someone`s Aunt Gertie and her cousin. It would be the June retreat format, with accommodation, meals, tuition, outings, all-inclusive once knitters arrived on site, or at the closest rail station, ferry dock, or bus stop.

DD and I are thinking of going to look-over suitable old houses after we graduate next spring.

Any interest? Comments?

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:42:09 PM
Knitting Retreats Hi
Definitely will not be high season -I`ll have 4 plane fares to pay for from the other side of the world - the cook, her willing husband to assist and do housekeeping, my husband to run the errands, and me. House rental is also much lower in the off-season, too. Late April or early May or late September or early October are probably the best times. Anyone for winter in Scotland with roaring fires? I`ll certainly keep the cost as low as possible. I started doing retreats because a friend and I really wanted to go to one but just couldn`t afford to, with assorted children still in school, college, and university, at the prices being advertised, and so we decided to put one on. Sadly, she died before the second one. She would have been delighted with the interesting people who have come.

One way to save for the trip is to buy everything on Visa, take the `points` plan not the air miles. Then apply the points to your plane ticket. (In Canada, Visa Travel will book any ticket you want, AND scout around to get the best deal. The points have a dollar value, not a distance value on a particular airline, so there`s much more choice. Inquire at your bank.) Then choose a "Cheap and Cheerful" airline. Planes are uncomfortable anyway, and some cheap and cheerful actually give you more seat space than brand name airlines. My children from age 10 onwards crossed the country, alone and with me, with FirstAir, RoyalAir, Canada3000, AirTransat, WestJet, and the like, they thought it was how normal people travelled. We always arrived and got back, which is more than I can say about the `regular` airlines my DH always took, with government booking at much higher fares. The points really add up - you are going to buy food, and yarn from elann anyway, so get a little extra enjoyment.

Think about it. I`m very pleased with the encouraging response.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:42:09 PM
Knitting Retreats Hi
Definitely will not be high season -I`ll have 4 plane fares to pay for from the other side of the world - the cook, her willing husband to assist and do housekeeping, my husband to run the errands, and me. House rental is also much lower in the off-season, too. Late April or early May or late September or early October are probably the best times. Anyone for winter in Scotland with roaring fires? I`ll certainly keep the cost as low as possible. I started doing retreats because a friend and I really wanted to go to one but just couldn`t afford to, with assorted children still in school, college, and university, at the prices being advertised, and so we decided to put one on. Sadly, she died before the second one. She would have been delighted with the interesting people who have come.

One way to save for the trip is to buy everything on Visa, take the `points` plan not the air miles. Then apply the points to your plane ticket. (In Canada, Visa Travel will book any ticket you want, AND scout around to get the best deal. The points have a dollar value, not a distance value on a particular airline, so there`s much more choice. Inquire at your bank.) Then choose a "Cheap and Cheerful" airline. Planes are uncomfortable anyway, and some cheap and cheerful actually give you more seat space than brand name airlines. My children from age 10 onwards crossed the country, alone and with me, with FirstAir, RoyalAir, Canada3000, AirTransat, WestJet, and the like, they thought it was how normal people travelled. We always arrived and got back, which is more than I can say about the `regular` airlines my DH always took, with government booking at much higher fares. The points really add up - you are going to buy food, and yarn from elann anyway, so get a little extra enjoyment.

Think about it. I`m very pleased with the encouraging response.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:42:09 PM
Knitting Retreats Hi
Definitely will not be high season -I`ll have 4 plane fares to pay for from the other side of the world - the cook, her willing husband to assist and do housekeeping, my husband to run the errands, and me. House rental is also much lower in the off-season, too. Late April or early May or late September or early October are probably the best times. Anyone for winter in Scotland with roaring fires? I`ll certainly keep the cost as low as possible. I started doing retreats because a friend and I really wanted to go to one but just couldn`t afford to, with assorted children still in school, college, and university, at the prices being advertised, and so we decided to put one on. Sadly, she died before the second one. She would have been delighted with the interesting people who have come.

One way to save for the trip is to buy everything on Visa, take the `points` plan not the air miles. Then apply the points to your plane ticket. (In Canada, Visa Travel will book any ticket you want, AND scout around to get the best deal. The points have a dollar value, not a distance value on a particular airline, so there`s much more choice. Inquire at your bank.) Then choose a "Cheap and Cheerful" airline. Planes are uncomfortable anyway, and some cheap and cheerful actually give you more seat space than brand name airlines. My children from age 10 onwards crossed the country, alone and with me, with FirstAir, RoyalAir, Canada3000, AirTransat, WestJet, and the like, they thought it was how normal people travelled. We always arrived and got back, which is more than I can say about the `regular` airlines my DH always took, with government booking at much higher fares. The points really add up - you are going to buy food, and yarn from elann anyway, so get a little extra enjoyment.

Think about it. I`m very pleased with the encouraging response.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/4/2004 8:25:11 PM
Alice: Great! What do you want to make? Tam? hat? scarf? purse? vest? socks? sweater? cardigan?

How much yarn do you have?

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/4/2004 8:41:43 PM
Knitting Retreats It`s called a Visa Gold Card here - and specify `points`. Ask at the bank. We paid for the materials to build our house on ours - lumber store was perfectly happy and we just paid the bill at the end of each month, and so points but no interest charges.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/4/2004 8:41:43 PM
Knitting Retreats It`s called a Visa Gold Card here - and specify `points`. Ask at the bank. We paid for the materials to build our house on ours - lumber store was perfectly happy and we just paid the bill at the end of each month, and so points but no interest charges.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/4/2004 8:41:43 PM
Knitting Retreats It`s called a Visa Gold Card here - and specify `points`. Ask at the bank. We paid for the materials to build our house on ours - lumber store was perfectly happy and we just paid the bill at the end of each month, and so points but no interest charges.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/5/2004 7:48:08 PM
Seeking Advice Please Hi
The Mock Turkish stitch (or mock turtle) is:
Row 1: K1, *YO, K2tog* until 1 stitch remains, K1
Row 2: K2, *YO, K2tog* . . .
Make sure that each row starts and ends with at least one knit stitch. A garter stitch border of 5 or 6 stitches works well, too.

Try a simple pattern to get the most zing from your yarn. If you would like a triangular shawl, Meg Swansen has a pretty garter stitch one in XRX`s Shawls and Scarves book.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/5/2004 8:25:14 PM
Is it wrong to expect a little help around here? The children were good about helping out when DH was away, but didn`t see why they should do chores when he was around and `forgot` his. Answer: I alloted him only chores which directly affected him. Sunday nights, I ironed 10 white shirts for the children to wear to school, and whatever I needed, but no shirts for him. I was even known to twist them tightly into knots in the laundry basket to make sure that they had a satisfying number of wrinkles. It was amazing how often he was frantically ironing one ten minutes before his carpool, whilst the children and I had a leisurely breakfast, and sometimes a row or two of knitting, before we lept into my car to go to our schools. Not making lunches is another stand-by, children are quite happy to make their own, and are quite capable of selecting at least one thing from each category.

I`ve discovered that here on Salt Spring, as opposed to a sealed, heated and cooled house in Ontario, that the dust bunnies can be controlled by opening all the doors to the deck on the exposed side, the windows on the other, and running the ceiling fan at at good clip. The dust bunnies cower in corners and are much easier to sweep up in clumps. Dirt in modern countries is rarely life-threatening; candlelight is very pleasing - think about how much extra knitting time you would have if you cleaned half as often. Buy a dishwasher and only use things that can go into it. We had a male nanny for a couple of years who alotted the children, one knife, one fork, one spoon, one plate, one bowl, one mug, and one glass each per day. They had to put them into the dishwasher after each meal, and take them out clean for the next. He had no hangups about `woman`s work`.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/6/2004 6:05:48 PM
knit along anyone?` Hi
For a moebius scarf with no finishing, cast on in the MIDDLE and knit in both directions - one row follows a figure-8 course. When you reach the desired width, cast off and you are done.
Let me know if you want directions and I`ll e-mail - no copyright, they`re mine. Mock-Turkish stitch works well and is so easy. Garter stitch is fine, too, just needs to be a stitch pattern that is reversible.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/7/2004 10:18:42 AM
Moebius Part 1 - Cast-Ons Hi Here are ways to cast on for a moebius. You need to end up with all of you stitches on a long circular needle - in a figure-8 shape.
Alice

Annabelle and Beatrice Cast-on
This uses two long circular needles, Annabelle, the working needle for the project is the larger one, Beatrice is much smaller.

1. Using Annabelle and the working yarn, loosely cast on the total number of stitches for the moebius (ex 400).
2. Hold together the end of Annabelle that does NOT have the yarn attached, and one end of Beatrice in your dominant hand. Slip the stitches (as if to purl) from the working end of Annabelle alternately onto the two needle ends in your dominant hand – one onto Annabelle, one onto Beatrice, one onto Annabelle, one onto Beatrice, . . . until all the cast on stitches have been moved. Be careful, a dropped stitch can be fatal.
3. The two needles are now parallel to each other, joined by the stitches. Put Annabelle and Beatrice down on a flat surface, and curve them into a circle.
4. The end of Annabelle with the yarn attached is your working needle. Place it in your dominant hand. Place a marker on Annabelle to show the beginning of the round. Following the pattern stitch, knit all the stitches from Beatrice. Set Beatrice aside, and place a different colour marker on Annabelle. This indicates the middle of the round. Continue knitting, in first row of pattern, the stitches from the other end of Annabelle. When first marker is reached, Annabelle will be shaped in a double loop. Continue working in pattern.

Invisible Cast-on
Use as a provisional cast-on when access to bottom loops is required.

1. Knot working yarn and cotton contrast yarn together. Hold needle and knot in the dominant hand. Hold yarns, a cm apart in the other hand, with the working yarn closest to you. Hold contrast yarn taut.
2. Pivot the needle to form a yarn over in from of the waste yarn and then from behind it. Continue to alternate until required number of stitches is reached.
3. Knit across the cast-on stitches in pattern.
4. Untie the knot, and remove waste yarn. Pick up and knit, in pattern, the loops between the cast on stitches. You will now have twice the number of cast on stitches minus one (2n – 1). If you need an even number of stitches, fudge one by increasing one or knitting two together. This works very well with a moss stitch band in the centre of the moebius - K1, P1, K1,P1 . . .

Double-Sided Loop Cast-on
Quick and easy.

1. Using the loop method, cast on half the required number of stitches.
2. Knit one row.
3. Turn work. Pick up and knit one stitch through each loop between the cast-on stitches. If you need an even number, increase one stitch at the end.
8/7/2004 10:24:52 AM
Moebius Part 2 - Stitch Patterns Here are some patterns which work well for scarves. Knit a swatch first on 30 stitches to figure out the number of stitches you need to cast on.

Alice

REVERSIBLE PATTERNS - 1

For samples, cast on 30 stitches.

MOCK TURKISH STITCH
Multiple of 2 stitches
Cast on an even number of stitches.
K1, (YO, K2tog) until last stitch, K1.
Repeat for required length.
FOR MOEBIUS: omit the K1 edge stitches.

COLUMNS
Multiple of 4 stitches
Cast on a multiple of 4 plus 2 stitches.
K2, (P1, YO, P2tog, K1) repeat to end of row.
Repeat for required length.
FOR MOEBIUS: omit the K2 at the start of the row.

PURL LACE
Multiple of 2 stitches
Cast on an even number of stitches.
Slip 1 knitwise, (P2tog, YO) repeat to last stitch, P1
Repeat for required length.
FOR MOEBIUS: omit the Slip1 and P1

JAPANESE LACE
Multiple of 3 stitches
Cast on multiple of 3 plus 3 stitches
ROW 1: K1, (P1, P2tog, YO) until last 2 stitches, P2
ROW 2: Slip 1 knitwise, (P1, P2tog, YO) until last 2 stitches, P2
NOTE: P2tog uses the YO and the P2tog of the previous row
8/7/2004 11:10:28 AM
Moebius Part 3 - Basic Instructions Using an invisible cast-on method, put on the number of stitches you need - from 144 for a 36 inch moebius at 4st = 1 inch to 400 for a long long one to go around head and shoulders, or about 90 for a head band. Make sure that you have no twists. The needle needs to trace a figure8 path when the cast-on is complete. Mark the start of the round and the midpoint (useful but not essential). One row = the whole way around the two loops of the needle back to the starting point. Each row moves towards the outside edge on both sides of the cast-on row. Knit stitches magically become purl stitches after you reach the mid-point - if you want the look to stay the same, you need to change the stitch. Hence the logic in using reversible patterns. Continue knitting until you reach the desired width. Then do one of the following:

1. cast off loosely, and have a sort of sac effect as the fabric drapes - quite attractive in Eros and Kitty

2. cast off VERY, VERY loosely so that the fabric does not pull-in as it drapes

3. crochet cast-off making 2 or 3 chain stitches between each live stitch on the knitting needle

4. knit a lace edging along the outside edge incorporating one live stitch on every other row until you are all the way around.

Fiber Trends has a very good pattern for a fairly long lacey moebius that is really pretty. I`ve knitted it in a kid mohair and also in a DK silk - very different effects but both equally attractive.

If you want your moebius to have more shape, you can create a pointy-piece or a scallop by short-rowing on one side.

This is an exercise in creative knitting - moving outside the boundaries. If you are not quite ready to soar, buy the Fiber Trends pattern to try out your wings.

Alice
8/9/2004 9:37:35 AM
Is it a man`s world? WAY TO GO!!!!!! Go right back and buy something else next week, even if it is just a few screws.
I`m the one who knows what to get, not DH (my father figured that his daughters needed to know how to do things just as well as his sons), so not only can I read blueprints, I can read them upsidedown (all teachers can read upsidedown), which leaves some men, especially none-too-competent architects speechless. Store clerks seek safety in "We don`t stock that", but don`t believe them for a second. My prize example of that was in a large hardware store in Ontario just north of Toronto. I got two steps out of the store, realized that I had been given a ridiculous answer, of course a big chain store would stock size 8, one inch screws in brass with Robinson heads. I only needed 12. I went back in, sat on the floor in the screw aisle, and opened boxes until I found exactly what I needed. I proceeded to give the same clerk a lengthy discourse on how to recognise different types of screws, so that he could help the next person who asked. There was no need for him to appear to be a complete idiot.
Hopefully, we do not treat men in knitting stores in the same way.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/19/2004 9:26:54 AM
Reason for Silence Hi Everyone

Sorry that I haven`t replied to any messages in the last ten days or so. I`ll try to catch up with at least some of them.

As some of you know, I was store director of a thrift store supporting a non-profit organization. The two paid employees and I resigned due to `ethical conflict` with the rest of the board. It`s all been rather stressful for us.

Those of you who have other people working for you, do remember that that page in the polices and procedures manual applies just as much to the worker bees as the queen bees. All too often people forget that those they regard as peons have rights, too, rights that need to be respected. Pushing issues under the rug solves nothing because you can`t knit away the bump that forms, instead the knitting unravels and the garment falls apart due to neglect.

Enough said.
Alice Trueman
Salt Spring Island
8/20/2004 10:48:11 AM
Alice- Carrie

An invisible cast-on is one that does not show in the finished work. It`s useful for a moebius that is knitted from the centre out in both directions, also for shawls. If you are not sure about a ribbing or edging for a sweater, an invisible cast-on gives you `live-stitches` to use to add the edging at the end. There are several methods.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/20/2004 10:48:11 AM
Alice- Carrie

An invisible cast-on is one that does not show in the finished work. It`s useful for a moebius that is knitted from the centre out in both directions, also for shawls. If you are not sure about a ribbing or edging for a sweater, an invisible cast-on gives you `live-stitches` to use to add the edging at the end. There are several methods.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
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