Alice Trueman - all messages by user

7/12/2004 9:51:47 AM
Role call: I will be a "good" knitter when.... Hey!
Bring those UFO`s to Salt Spring in the fall and we can bug each other to get them done. Or else trade them around - maybe it`s easier to sew up someone else`s project. Just think, if you came for the whole nine days, what you could get finished. Price is right, too - $450CDN or $360US to get everything finished!!! Point out to the family what you are saving on the food bill by being away. Think of all the yarn you could buy when all those UFO`s become FO`s.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/13/2004 7:58:27 AM
Schachenmayr design 5192a Women`s Lacy top Hi Cheryl

Where do I find the pattern? Is it the Princess Vest under `Free Patterns`?
If you can send the pattern to me, or if it is in a magazine I have, I`ll write it out in words for you.
Fax number is 250-538-0221.

Don`t give up.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/14/2004 8:51:40 AM
Schachenmayr design 5192a Women`s Lacy top I`ve got the pattern up on the screen, if it`s the summer top with waterlilies (?) up the front, but can`t download it. I don`t have that book.
Simplest is to fax it to me. 1-250-538-0221. Computers and fax share the same line and faxes go through DH`s printer combo, so if it doesn`t go through, try again a little later. It`ll probably work first time, but DH doesn`t use the fax, so is always a little nervous about it.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/15/2004 9:09:38 AM
some sad news to share Try to knit, and knit in the good memories of times you had together.
My thoughts are with you.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/15/2004 9:26:12 AM
Happy ending? Heather

All the best. Keep on the list, keep chatting.
Try knitting socks for all three of you as a nuclear family bond. When extended family intrudes, just look down at your socks as a reminder and a secret code between you.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/16/2004 8:31:28 AM
Survey Question Good question!
I ended up graduating in History and Archaeology and now am in grad school in History, but I started out in Math (boring), switched to History after a year, and spent 30 years teaching high school English, the last umpteen as department head. I always seemed to have a department full of math phobics, who took on a glazed look and flapped at the first sight of number. At mark time, I would patiently re-explain means and medians to each in turn as I reviewed his/her class sheets, but always worked them out myself. They accepted what I said and toddled off contented. Very competent teachers of English, but hopeless at Math. Now that I think back, I also straightened out their knitting, worked out how many gallons of paint they needed to repaint their houses, and the angle they needed for building that dog-house roof.
My unexplored theory is that if you can visualize a mathematical situation on the back of your mind, and scrol it backwards and forwards and around so that you can seen see all sides of it, and manipulate it, you are good at math, if you can`t, you`re not. I think perhaps it`s somewhat the same with knitting. If you can visualize the stitches and manipulate them without yarn in your hands, then you have moved beyond the technical aspect of working the stitches into the creative. Elsebeth Lavold must be able to visualize the workings when she looks at carved stone.
My father was a whiz at Math, Mark`s father was an electrical engineer, Mark is a meteorologist, but our two children are math phobics, go figure.
I love my non-professional CAD computer programme - back to visualization.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/16/2004 11:28:28 PM
Cheryl`s Top Hi Cheryl

I`ve worked the graphs and instructions for Top 5192A in the smallest size into words and written symbols. How do I e-mail it back to you? It`s a bit long to post on the list, unless other people want the explanation, too. Pattern A was quite tricky to start with as the stitch count does not come out to 13, no matter what the graph implies. Looks very pretty knitted up - at least the first 24 rows do. Good definition on the waterlily.

My e-mail is trueman@uniserve.com, what is yours?

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/18/2004 10:06:08 AM
Fair Isle Sweater problems... HELP! Try putting all of the stitches on a LONG piece of yarn, tie the ends together and steam, as above. Then measure the gauge. If you can reach it by using a smaller needle, do that. If not, reduce the number of stitches to reach the dimension of the fair isle part. If either of these makes the sweater too small for the body which needs to go into it try:
a) bottom-up: gradually increase stitches up the `sides` until you are up to the required number or
give the sweater to a different body

b)top-down yoke: increase at the `four corners` in the plain colour until you are back up to the size you need, then divide for sleeves. Double increase at each point every other row works fine - kkkkkkM1kkkkM1kkkkkkkk. This will make the yoke a little longer but that won`t matter.

c)top-down drop shoulder with steeks for sleeves:Knit down to the bottom of your sleeve with your NEW stitch count. Then cast on the number of additional stitches you need, half at each underarm. This will inset the sleeve a bit, but also reduces underarm bulk. I usually knit drop-shoulders with this inset.

You need to have the gauge flowing evenly from pattern to plain - it won`t even up with wear.

Next time - keep at least the first two inches on the right-hand needle flat, to stretch out the floats. Or, try two handed fair isle weaving the other yarn in every other stitch - the Philosopher`s Wool method in book and video - which does not bunch up in the same way.
HTH
Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/20/2004 10:07:13 AM
Knitting in the round question Patricia
Try snugging up the last and first stitches of each round. This should help. You will also find that the gap becomes less and less noticable as you knit down - the later rows seem to pull in the early ones.
Another technique is to cross-over the first and last stitches, but I don`t usually find that this is necessary.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/22/2004 9:46:55 AM
Outback for shawl I`m knitting the Outback Mohair in the shawl featured with the yarn on an 8mm needle (US#11, CDN#0) and it looks great. Delicate it is not, this is a yarn with lots of body. Patsy has finished hers, but as she knits more tightly, it does not look as lacy. We both prefer the more open look for this yarn.
Pick a bold pattern and big needles, swatch until you like the look, and you`ll be pleased.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/22/2004 9:56:05 AM
Want a chuckle... That`s really good. Women on Salt Spring make a similar calendar three years ago to buy land from a logging company to preserve it from clear-cut. Ours made a double page spread in the Globe and Mail (Toronto newspaper) which gave a huge boost to sales.

Besides being funny, this is a good fun-raising project.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/29/2004 9:08:55 AM
Quiz Time! Hi Eileen
I think the instruction are telling you to pick up on one row and bind off on the next. This will give a very narrow edging but is probably all you need. This does the same thing as an I-cord edging.
The buttonholes are formed by doing a YO in place of picking up a stitch. On the return, bind-off row, purl into the YO (instead of knit or slip) before you bind it off, to make the stitch tighter and matching.

If you really don`t have a 5mm (US#8) needle, try a few inches of pick-up and bind-off with a 4.5mm and see what it looks like. The only live stitches are the ones you pick up, so it`s easy to pull out with no damage done.
Sit down with a pot of tea and just get it done! You`ll be so pleased.
Post back if it doesn`t work.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/29/2004 9:21:26 AM
If at first you dont succeed...... Patricia
Don`t be afraid of fair isle. Have a look at the tam I posted. It doesn`t have an `exact` fit, because in most yarns you need to put elastic in the casing anyway. If it needs blocking, you can fit it around a plate and steam until it`s flat.
Here are simple instructions - no copyright violation, Ann, because I made them up myself as I knitted the denim one. Any small patterns, up to about 15 rows before the decreases and fewer rows after the decreases start, work fine. Give it a whirl.

Alice
Salt Spring Island

FAIR ISLE TAM

This makes a large size in worsted weight yarn (20 st = 4 inches) and a medium in DK (22 st = 4inches) and an adult small in sport weight (24 st = 4 inches). To make smaller, reduce by units of 12 stitches.
Needle size: 4mm for worsted and DK, 3.5mm for sport.
Yarn: Approx. 225 yards (100g) of assorted colours.

With A, cast on 120 stitches. Place marker. Join.
Knit 2K 2P rib for 12 rows (or twice the desired band width for cotton , or band width for wool).
Next row: K2, *M1, rib 2* to end, M1 (180 stitches).
Knit 1 row with A.
Knit in patterns for 28 rows.
Next row: *K6, K2tog* around the row, K4.
Knit 10 rows in patterns.
Next row: *K5, K2tog* around the row, K3.
Knit 5 rows in patterns.
Next row: *K4, K2tog* around the row, K2.
Knit 4 rows in patterns.
Next Row:*K3, K2tog* around the row, K1, K2tog.
Knit 3 rows in pattern.
Next row: *K2, K2tog*.
Knit 2 rows.
Next row: *K1, K2tog* around the row.
Knit 1 row.
Next row: Change colour, *K2tog* around the row.
Next row: *K2tog* around the row.
Cut yarn leaving a 6-8 inch end. Thread end through the remaining stitches and secure firmly.

Finishing: Weave in loose ends. For cotton version, fold band in half to the wrong side, whip stitch in place leaving one small gap. Thread elastic through the gap, tighten to desired size, knot or sew the ends. Block over a plate.

Note: A little fudging to make decreases/patterns fit won’t be obvious. Just do it.
7/29/2004 9:38:50 AM
plymouth outback wool/mohair Hi Susan
I`ve used the mohair in the mosaic grid pattern that Shelley posted and in a partially completed shawl. I`m using the wool for the Bressay Jacket in Jamieson`s Shetland Knitting Book 3 in place of their Chunky Shetland. I`m knitting it all on a 5mm circular needle instead of going up to the 5.5mm for the body as I want it good and firm to wear outdoors in the winter. I`ve finished the back and the twisted cables in the ribbing at the bottom and the yoke are very well defined even though the yarn is quite soft. It has a good twist to it which gives it a firmness.
It knits up to quite a heavy fabric - too warm for wearing indoors here (climate is similar to coastal northern California) as, unlike 50 years ago, everyone has central heating or powerful wood stoves, if they are back-to-the-landers.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/31/2004 9:11:07 AM
Alice`s Tam pattern Hi Benne
Yarn sounds just great for Dorcas. Please send it. Many, many thanks.
I`ll try e-mailing you the directions for Top 5192A, but I may need to fax them. AOL wouldn`t take them for Cheryl - I guess too long or too many symbols. I`ll send them now (9:10PDT), and if they don`t arrive by this afternoon, let me know and we`ll try plan B.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
7/31/2004 9:38:28 AM
Elann Sock It To Me Toe-Up free pattern - is it a typo, please help! Hi Cate
I haven`t knitted this pattern, but I`ve just printed it off and looked at it. What you are making is a little pocket to put the heel of your foot into. On the largest size, you have 12 stitches at the bottom of the pocket (4th row) and then you are making the pocket wider, row by row, until you reach 34 stitches - you are doing this by increasing the length of the short rows.
Try it, and I think it`ll work out fine. If, not, write back and I`ll knit it.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:31:04 AM
knitting for charity Hi
See what your local organization needs. We find that different villages in the north need more of certain things in our standard selection. ie a nursing home may need lots of small afghans to tuck around people in wheel chairs, whereas an other place with a young population may be desperate for baby clothes. By the way, the nursing home residents really like the knitted bears and dolls. Toques in bright colours seem to be very popular with the kids.
As to supplying women`s shelters, check carefully about clothes - or anything that might lead to identification of a resident. Afghans are much safer. This whole island runs on volunteers, and amongst the many projects we have the transition house (safe house) for the Gulf Islands - volunteer board, paid professional counselling staff. I`m the director of the thrift store we run - paid manager and assistant manager and volunteer helpers - which provides credits for women and children in the house for clothes and household items, and sells to the general public to pay the bills and top up the grant money for the house. As we are the front to the world, we have had our share of bounty hunters looking for children, women trying to sign on as volunteers to watch for women who might be in the house, mysterious packages, phone calls, and the like, and we are just a little island off the west coast. So ask first, and check with the shelter how to ensure anonymity.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:31:04 AM
Knitting for charity Hi
See what your local organization needs. We find that different villages in the north need more of certain things in our standard selection. ie a nursing home may need lots of small afghans to tuck around people in wheel chairs, whereas an other place with a young population may be desperate for baby clothes. By the way, the nursing home residents really like the knitted bears and dolls. Toques in bright colours seem to be very popular with the kids.
As to supplying women`s shelters, check carefully about clothes - or anything that might lead to identification of a resident. Afghans are much safer. This whole island runs on volunteers, and amongst the many projects we have the transition house (safe house) for the Gulf Islands - volunteer board, paid professional counselling staff. I`m the director of the thrift store we run - paid manager and assistant manager and volunteer helpers - which provides credits for women and children in the house for clothes and household items, and sells to the general public to pay the bills and top up the grant money for the house. As we are the front to the world, we have had our share of bounty hunters looking for children, women trying to sign on as volunteers to watch for women who might be in the house, mysterious packages, phone calls, and the like, and we are just a little island off the west coast. So ask first, and check with the shelter how to ensure anonymity.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:42:20 AM
I`m baffled! Hi Les
There are two ways off attacking those bound off stitches - the first is as above, sewing the first 8 rows of the sleeve to them. The other is to pick up those stitches, too. The second gives you more underarm movement - sort of the same idea as a gusset in a gansey, but only the second half of a gusset. This may give you most or all of the extra stitches you need with no puckers. You can usually fudge an extra stitch at the shoulder seam if you need it, then space out any more so that they look intentional. Also, measure around the human arm and see how many stitches you actually need. You may prefer a tighter looking sleeve.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
8/2/2004 10:48:34 AM
Is it ever okay to make a knot? Big needle dilemma I talked to Kaffe Fassett last year as he sat knitting under a big umbrella at the quilt festival in Sisters, Oregon, and his attitude was that he ties really good knots, so why not.
I knitted for years before anyone told me that I was not supposed to tie knots, by then it was too late. Use a reef knot, not a granny knot.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
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