Alice Trueman - all messages by user

3/11/2003 6:02:03 PM
Knitting Retreats on Salt Spring Island, Canada A few places still available for "Moebius and Lace" retreat with Cat Bordi June 30 - July 6.
New this year - Novice Knitting Weekends.
Contact me for details at trueman@uniserve.com
3/13/2003 8:36:35 AM
Knitting Retreats on Salt Spring Island, Canada Early May, June 6,7,8 and August 8,9,10 for the Novice Retreats. All-inclusive weekend at $275CDN.
Arrive for dinner on the Friday, knit and learn all weekend, and leave after afternoon tea on the Sunday.
e-mail me at trueman@uniserve.com and I`ll send you an electronic flyer.
3/13/2003 8:54:33 AM
How do I charge for my work? I`ve seen the following several different times on KnitU:
Cost of the yarn, plus $.08US/$.12CDN per YARD for simple knitting, for cables, fancy colour work etc, add 50% more, plus $20-$50US/$30-$75CDN for finishing if there is a lot of blocking, seaming,construction etc to do. Your time and skill are valuable.
The biggest problem with relating the charge for knitting to the yarn cost is that the charge for working with bargin acrylic from a discount store would be only a fraction of the charge for knitting high quality merino from elann. Which would you rather knit?
3/19/2003 9:18:37 AM
Kitchener Stitch and Sock Toes Hi
To get a very neat toe, with no puppy-dog ears, try the following:
When you start, run your bodkin (darning needle) purlwise through the first TWO stitches on the front needle, and knitwise through the first TWO stitches on the back needle. Treat each of these pairs as one stitch. Then proceed across the toe, using one stitch at a time from each needle,until you have two stitches remaining on each needle. Treat each of these remaining pairs as one stitch. Once you slip off the last stitch, push the bodkin through to the inside of the sock, turn the sock inside out and weave the end through at least ten stitches. Cut, leaving a half inch tail.
Kitchener Stitch: Use a 12 inch tail from the knitting, threaded through a blunt bodkin (darning needle). Take a deep breath, line up the two knitting needles, with wrong sides of knitting together, and proceed:
Slide threaded bodkin through first stitch on the front needle purlwise, through the first stitch on the back needle knitwise (leave both on needles for now). *Then go through the first stitch on the front needle knitwise, and slide it off needle, go through next stitch on front needle purlwise and leave on needle. Go through first stitch on back needle purlwise, slide off needle, go through next back stitch knitwise and leave on the needle. Go through the front stitch knitwise (you have already given it the purlwise treatment) and slide it off the needle, go through the next front stitch purlwise and leave on the needle. Go through the back stitch purlwise, slide off the needle, go through next stitch knitwise and leave on the needle.* Repeat from * to * until you run out of stitches. After the last stitch is slid off, fasten end of yarn on wrong side. For socks, treat first and last pairs as above.
3/27/2003 5:27:47 PM
Knitting Retreats on Salt Spring Island, Canada Salt Spring Island is on the West Coast of Canada in sheltered water between the mainland and Vancouver Island. If you look at a map of Washington State, find the San Juan Islands, north of Seattle, then look across the international boundary to the largest island in the group of little islands. It`s easy to get to; we had a knitter from Connecticut last year.
3/29/2003 11:06:19 AM
Salt Spring Island Knitting Retreat The "Magical Moebius & Lace" retreat June 30 to July 6 has been revised since my last posting about it. Cat Bordhi cancelled out of teaching, quite unexpectedly, last week. I will be teaching the same theme, but with some modifications to suit my strengths. Cost is reduced as I am not a "big name". A few places left for knitters wanting to have a great time. e-mail me at trueman@uniserve.com for more information.
4/15/2003 7:54:30 AM
knitting both fronts at once Steeks are used on Norwegian-style cardigans so that thebody can be knitted in the round. The principle works just fine for two fronts. Knit 5 extra stitches (for the steek) in the centre front. Then when the front is finished, run a basting thread up the centre of stitch 3 of the steek - use a high contrast. Then, go to your sewing machine, and with a fairly small straight stitch, sew TWO rows of stitching up EACH side of the steek in the middle of stitches 1 and 5. The next bit is heresy to traditional knitters, but it works - pick up stitches on the sweater sides of the machine stitching rows, and knit your bands. Now, be very brave, and cut up the front along the basting line - use sharp scissors and try to cut with confidence to keep the edges straight. Herringbone stitch down the raggedy edges, or fold the band over to cover them, and you are done. Not as scary as it sounds at first.

Alice
4/15/2003 9:43:39 PM
bias knitting Have a look at Nancie Wiseman`s book "Knitted Sweaters for Every Season". The book concentrates on four techniques, of which diagonal (bias) knitting is one - 29 pages of a lesson and patterns. Other topics are slipped and mosaic stitches, interlocking squares and diamonds, and short rows, following the same format of a lesson and patterns. Elann has it in stock. It`s an excellent book, well worth the investment.
Alice
5/3/2003 7:21:59 PM
new knitter needs help Hi Cat
Try starting by looking at an existing sweater that is knitted in stocking stitch - a machine knit one will do fine. You can tell that it is stocking stitch if the stitches on the `right side` are all like little V`s. These are KNIT stitches, have a good look at them so that you can recognize them. Now turn over to the `wrong side` and look at the stitches on this side. They`ll look like a whole lot of little bumps, rows and rows of them. Make the acquaintance of one of them as this is what PURL stitches look like. So, on row 2, if the stitch looks like a little V, knit it; if it looks like a bump, right up close to the needle, purl it. This is called "reading your knitting" and you`ll soon get on to it.
Row 2 will be K1, P8, but it`s much better to learn to read the stitches rather than following a pattern by rote. Give it a try.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
5/3/2003 7:21:59 PM
new knitter needs help Hi Cat
Try starting by looking at an existing sweater that is knitted in stocking stitch - a machine knit one will do fine. You can tell that it is stocking stitch if the stitches on the `right side` are all like little V`s. These are KNIT stitches, have a good look at them so that you can recognize them. Now turn over to the `wrong side` and look at the stitches on this side. They`ll look like a whole lot of little bumps, rows and rows of them. Make the acquaintance of one of them as this is what PURL stitches look like. So, on row 2, if the stitch looks like a little V, knit it; if it looks like a bump, right up close to the needle, purl it. This is called "reading your knitting" and you`ll soon get on to it.
Row 2 will be K1, P8, but it`s much better to learn to read the stitches rather than following a pattern by rote. Give it a try.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
5/7/2003 7:26:20 AM
Edge Stitch? Hi Donna

An `edge stitch` is a plain stitch on each side before and beyond the pattern stitches, so that it is easier to sew up the seams neatly. These are the stitches you are going to use for your seams. To get a good, firm edge that is easy to sew, I knit the edge stitches on the right side and purl them on the wrong side. I find that this makes for a more even and less visible seam than slipping the first stitch. To sew up, use mattress stitch, or back stitch working between the edge stitch and the first stitch of the pattern. When finished, this gives you pattern stitch against pattern stitch, so the seam hardly shows at all. You must incorporate all the edge stitch into the seam; do NOT just whip together the edge stitches. Sew with the right side facing you, so that you can see what you are doing.
If you are knitting in the round, eliminate the edge stitches, because you won`t have seams.
This pattern won`t be too difficult if you take it one step at a time. Keep looking at what you are doing, read your knitting, and you`ll be fine.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
5/20/2003 8:42:11 AM
Adjusting Patterns? Hi Annie
Yes, it can be done. I do it all the time, I see a picture that I like and go from there. BUT, if you have not knitted for very long, you need to do some advance planning. Buy yourself a pad of graph paper with the lines drawn at 4 squares to the inch, in 81/2" x 14" if you can get it (same stuff children use in school). Choose a simple shape that has a schematic included with the pattern. A schematic is a little diagram of the pieces of the garment showing the measurements of the various sizes. Draw the schematic, in the finished size you want, on the graph paper using one square per inch (or one centimetre if it`s a Canadian or European pattern). Write the measurements outside of your diagram. Now swatch, swatch, swatch in the yarn you want to use -in stocking stitch, garter stitch, and the patterns used. Find the needle size that gives you the best looking swatch. Avoid thin and limp, you won`t like the finished product - deliberate holes are fine for airiness, but not loose stitches. Once you have made your choice, knit it again, so you have two pieces to measure. Block both pieces. Choose a 4" square in the middle of each swatch, mark the corners with pins, and carefully count stitches and rows on each. If the gods are smiling, the counts will be the same. If they are wildly different, knit another swatch and compare it to #2. Once you have a stitch and row count, divide each by 4 (or 10 if you are working in centimetres). This is the number of stitches and rows for each square on your diagram. Write out the pattern from "Cast on" onwards. For any shaping, decide how many stitches you need to increase or decrease to make the shape on your graph paper. If you are knitting a pattern, you may need to add or subtract a few stitches to fit the pattern repeat plus edge stitches. Write it all out before you begin. Then start knitting! You have designed your own pattern.
It`s your knitting so you can do whatever you want! Remember, it`s just one stitch at a time.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
5/20/2003 8:48:41 AM
more dying to dye! Hi
You can paint the yarn with the Wilton colours, too. I produced the most amazing lopi in a magenta, lilac, royal blue blend. I dabbed the colour on with popsicle sticks, kneaded it through the yarn, to get many variations, then nuked it, rinsed well, and hung it up to dry. I kept stroking the skein for days, it was so fascinating.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
5/21/2003 8:58:43 AM
yarn and needles Hi
You can find what you need to know on the elann site. Go to SEARCH, click on 100% superwash wool and off-white. This will lead you to:
Schoeller Stahl Schnellstrick Granda Closeouts

The description will tell you that this yarn will knit to 16 stitches to 4 inches on 6mm needles with 82 yards per 50g ball. The needles you can order from elann by clicking on Needles and Hooks under Products on the top left of your screen.
For a generous scarf 10" x 56" you would need 4 balls of yarn for a knit/purl pattern, another 2 will make a hat. If you want all garter stitch (knit every row), order 6 for the scarf and 3 for the hat.
For the scarf, cast on 40 stitches (4 stitches per inch x 10 inches) and keep knitting in your pattern until you have about a yard of yarn left, then cast off. This will make you a very cosy scarf which you can wrap twice around your neck, or have long ends hanging down.

To be absolutely accurate about the amount of yarn, knit a 4 inch square - cast on 16 stitches, knit about 24 rows (32 for garter stitch), then pull it out and measure the yarn you used. Divide this number by 16 (4"x4" and you will get the amount you need for each square inch of knitting. If you want 10"x56", multiply the amount for one square inch by 560. Remember to divide by 36 to get yards. That junior school arithmetic really has a use!

Alice
Salt Spring Island





Fibre Content: 100% Superwash Wool
Made In: Italy
Care: Machine Wash Gentle/ Dry Flat
Gauge: 16 st/4 inches on 6 mm (US 10)
Yardage: 75 m (82 yds)
Size: 50g (1.75 oz) ball

Schoeller Stahl Schnellstrick Granda Closeouts

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Fibre Content: 100% Superwash Wool
Made In: Italy
Care: Machine Wash Gentle/ Dry Flat
Gauge: 16 st/4 inches on 6 mm (US 10)
Yardage: 75 m (82 yds)
Size: 50g (1.75 oz) ball
6/10/2003 5:45:26 PM
Adjusting Patterns? Yes, should work just as well for crocheting. Just plan it out on graph paper, and measure the yarn in your swatch. Remember that any mofif will be larger.
Alice
6/16/2003 7:39:33 AM
Which Magazines? My favourite by far is Knitter`s. Clear instructions, good size range, yarn information so that I can order a substitute with confidence from elann. (No yarn store here on the island) Projects are not as "high fashion" as Vogue, but not dowdy either. Lots of good articles. It`s published by XRX in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. XRX supports a large website www.knittinguniverse.com, which, in turn, sponsors KnitU, an on-line discussion group, Athena for help etc., and an on-line marketplace. David Xenakis, one of the X`s in XRX, takes his turn as "List Dad"; Rick Mondragon, the editor, answers his own phone; they all knit and can answer complicated questions. They are open for submissions - you don`t have to be a big name to be published!
Alice
Salt Spring Island
6/16/2003 4:52:04 PM
Winding those lovely skeins Hi Debbie
One solution is to buy aswift and awool winder. An alternative is to learn to hold the skein with your knees. Sit with your feet up on a stool, the rungs of a chair in front of you, or the coffee table - just make bony knees. Put the skein firmly over your knees and start winding, holding your hands out over your knees. Move your hands in an orbital motion as you wind. As I am right-handed, I usually orbit clockwise, but I can wind in the other direction if the skein wants to go that way. For a single skein at a time, this is faster than getting out the swift and wool-winder.
CAUTION Do not let the skein slide off your knees, no matter what the boys do.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
6/16/2003 9:11:44 PM
Knitting Retreat on Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada I suddenly have two places available for this year`s retreat - due to a cancellation because of a family crisis. I know it`s short notice, but can be done if you are within driving distance of the Vancouver/Seattle area. Some of you, who know no knitters, come and meet others, learn, and have fun. E-mail me at trueman@uniserve.com for more information.
Alice
6/29/2003 9:22:22 AM
Mexicali Baby Ole Hi Carola
The sweater will come out TWICE as big in both directions. Fortissima is pretty dependable at 30st=4", whereas, the Winter Cotton will give you 30st=8", ie 20" circumference in the sock yarn will become 40" circumference.
What I would suggest is to draw out the shape in the finished size you want on paper - graph paper with 4 squares to the inch works relly well. Then measure your swatch carefully - stitches and rows - and plug these numbers into the schematic you have drawn. Write the cast-on numbers and increase numbers onto the schematic and away you go. Just remember that your squares are inches not stitches.
Alice
Salt Spring Island, Canada
7/6/2003 10:41:25 AM
Christmas ideas-easy lace scarf???? Hi Bets
I`ve just finished teaching a five day retreat on moebius scarves and lace.
Here`s SUPER-easy which the knitters liked a lot.
Using 6mm needles, cast on 32 stitches. Knit in Mock-Turkish Stitch until you have about 36 inches of yarn left, or you reach the length you want. Cast off loosely. Twist one end of the piece 180 degrees. Sew the ends together. The twist will make the piece into a moebius, which will drape elegantly around the shoulders. You`ll have plenty of yarn in one ball.
MOCK-TURKISH STITCH - K1, (YO, K2tog) to the last stitch, K1. Repeat for desired length. You can vary the pattern by knitting K2, (YO, K2tog) until 2 stitches remain on EVEN-numbered rows.
Very attractive, easy, and fast.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
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