7/30/2009 6:12:01 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
I`ve been eyeballing small looms lately. Anyone have any experience with things like tri-looms or the Spriggs square looms? Would I rather have one of those or a little one, like a Cricket?
7/30/2009 11:37:57 PM
kellygirl
kellygirl
Posts 1406
Are we going a stash busting?
7/31/2009 5:22:16 AM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Yes. Because Lord knows I don`t have this particular type of stash busting equipment in my house.
7/31/2009 5:35:35 AM
Guest
Guest
Depends on what you are trying to make.

The triangle looms make big triangles, are fun to work on, and I understand there is a way to weave one triangle on top of another and get a square, but those are the shapes you are limited to.

A loom like a cricket will make long strips of fabric. Good for scarves, I would think, especially good if you have funky yarns you want to use in same. To make a garment, lots of piecing long strips together.

A larger rigid-heddle loom can make wider fabric, suitable for blouses, etc, although the limit with these is that (and this would be true of the cricket, too) you are limited in how fine a fabric you can make. So a larger rigid-heddle loom might be good for, say, placemats, heavyweight garments, small rugs, but you will probably not be making any silk blouse fabric on it.

Once you get to looms with harnesses you have a much more versatile tool, and you can do almost anything - but in truth, it is my understanding - not that I have ever tried it out - that the very simplest looms can do all the things the most complicated looms can do, albeit with a million times more time and effort.

Jamie and Daryl could probably tell you better...

T
7/31/2009 6:47:47 AM
Amy QOY
Amy QOY
Posts 3839
I have a cricket. I love it. It is a great stash buster and allows you to use smaller qualities of nice yarns to make scarves. My stash is lots of handpaints and dabs of this and that lux yarn and it is perfect. Also if you look around cyberspace there are tons of great creative ideas for things to do in plainweave.
I have a bigger rigid heddle loom I will probably get rid of because the Cricket is really all I need.
7/31/2009 7:16:42 AM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Amy-do you feel like you could put your scarves together and form a blankie? I have been really considering these-

http://hillcreekfiberstudio.com/SpriggsAdjustableFrameLms.html
7/31/2009 10:59:39 AM
Amy QOY
Amy QOY
Posts 3839
Yes. I forgot to add, the bigger rigid heddle I have is about 24". Even though I have a stand it is awkward to use. The Cricket sits in your lap and is great to weave on while watching TV. It is very quick and easy to warp, which means it gets warped, unlike the other that takes so long to warp that I never get motivated to fool with it. However, max width on the Cricket will be about 10". You can see several Christmas scarves on my flickr page. http://www.flickr.com/photos/15779323@N06/
7/31/2009 11:02:57 AM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Those are nice! When you started, how long did it take you to make your first scarf?
7/31/2009 12:28:28 PM
Amy QOY
Amy QOY
Posts 3839
The key is to get the selvedges even. My first ones had issues. Fortunately those issues are easily disquised by a nice single crochet up each side to cover the wonkiness. Once you warp the loom it is only a couple of hours to weave the scarf. Warping the loom is about a 45 minute endeavor, but again it is light years faster than my bigger loom. The Cricket instructions are very clear and easy to follow.
7/31/2009 12:46:36 PM
kellygirl
kellygirl
Posts 1406
Tempting, Amy! Your woven scarves are gorgeous! I hope you get one, Bets. It looks like it has lots of potential. I`ll even send you some of my stash in case you need more practice yarn.
7/31/2009 3:29:51 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Thanks, Chuckles....I mean Kelly.

;-)
7/31/2009 4:47:40 PM
Amy QOY
Amy QOY
Posts 3839
Thank you. Those were Christmas presents. It was great to have time for last miniute gifts.
7/31/2009 5:42:05 PM
Daryl
Daryl
Posts 3079
Oooh. Another craft with equipment! It is very nice to have accessible and I think you would do a wonderful job combining colors and textures to use up your random skeins of stash, although then you start purchasing yarn in CONES, not just skeins. I would recommend starting small, try a table loom. Louet has a great small rigid heddle and there are a bunch of rigid heddles from the 70s to look at the packaging. LOTS of people get the equipment then lose interest so I would recommend starting out with ebay for a try, then if you get hooked cruise the spinners and weavers housecleaning pages. You can often get a whole mess of equipment from someone moving or losing space.(http://www.kbbspin.org/taxonomy/term/6)
7/31/2009 8:25:02 PM
Guest
Guest
Ten inches is wider than I thought! Thanks for mentioning that, Amy! My HUGe centered mind immediately tried to come up with other things you can do with fabric that wide - covers for paperback books, small bags of various kinds, belts, and for that matter, a lot of patterns have pieces that are not more than ten inches wide, or can be split to be that, depending on the style.Also, there is a way to weave something twice as wide as your loom normally allows, but you might need to get extra rigid heddles to do it. I don`t remember the details.

I have a very narrow Beka loom - I should dig it out and take a look at it to see what I can do with it.

T
7/31/2009 9:23:55 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
T-Daryl and Amy are offering loomy advice-have you seen any triangle looms? Do they look like I won`t lose bits?

PS I can`t open your post about prayer. Can you paste it in this thread?
8/1/2009 6:41:59 AM
Guest
Guest
Bets - Triangle looms are pretty much a big triangle frame. Honestly, while the made ones are very nice, I think you could do it yourself with a hammer, some one by twos and a picture. That way, even if it didn`t hold up as long, you`d have tried it and seen if you liked it before you spent a lot of money. The looms are basically one piece, and the thing you weave with is very similar to a piece of bent coathanger. Not much there to lose. BUT they really need to be up on the stand, from what I have been told. The one time I tried one at a fiber festival, it was up on a stand. The ones you can make a shawl on are HUGE.

I will call you about the other thing.

T
8/1/2009 6:58:02 AM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
I have a husband with a hammer. Wonder where I can find plans and instructions for use?
8/1/2009 9:29:30 AM
Jamie
Jamie
Posts 3462
Bets, I`m following all the advice and comments you are getting and don`t have anything new to add. I will say that I do some stash busting (at least faster use of yarn) with my floor loom. My next loom project will be some scarves with tencel and several of Elann`s great cotton+ fibers featured in the Spring Agate shawl pattern. Designing and warping the loom are the slow parts of weaving; the weaving off is fast. I`m making placemats from the Adara and can complete weaving in about 20 minutes.
Keep us informed about the final outcome of this thread. Hugs,
Jamie
8/1/2009 9:39:05 AM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
What would you pick, Jamie? What would you suggest to a beginner?
8/1/2009 9:53:26 AM
Amy QOY
Amy QOY
Posts 3839
There is a weaving group on ravelry. I would go there and ask about plans for a triangle loom. I think someone out there sells them.
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