5/19/2003 7:21:35 PM
Guest
Guest
Hello everyone. I`m kind of new at knitting. Please be patient with me. My question is - I live in Florida and want to make a cotton sweater that is light weight. Can I use a pattern that uses a heavier weight and larger stitches and adjust it down to a lighter weight with smaller stiches? If the pattern I like is made in Worsted or Chunky, can I adjust it to Sport or DK weight? I was trying to think it out and I know it would require more stitches. Is that too complicated to bother with?

By the way, I love this site!
5/20/2003 3:19:45 AM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Hi-

Well you CAN, but if you are new to it, I think you should proceed with caution. I suggest instead that instead of making a switch in weight, look for a similar weight in a yarn you can live with. For instance, a worsted weight wool can be swapped for Eviva, which I think is still for sale here, or Topacio. (I live in south TX, I don`t need wool either!) Alternatively, look at some of the Berrocco patterns-some of them have multiple sweaters in different gauges, which is what you want. I bought #200, which has 5 shells and tanks in 3 gauges each. THIS should help you until you have a good idea of the way YOU knit. Once you figure that out, you`ll have a little more latitude.
5/20/2003 8:42:11 AM
Alice Trueman
Alice Trueman
Posts 1784
Hi Annie
Yes, it can be done. I do it all the time, I see a picture that I like and go from there. BUT, if you have not knitted for very long, you need to do some advance planning. Buy yourself a pad of graph paper with the lines drawn at 4 squares to the inch, in 81/2" x 14" if you can get it (same stuff children use in school). Choose a simple shape that has a schematic included with the pattern. A schematic is a little diagram of the pieces of the garment showing the measurements of the various sizes. Draw the schematic, in the finished size you want, on the graph paper using one square per inch (or one centimetre if it`s a Canadian or European pattern). Write the measurements outside of your diagram. Now swatch, swatch, swatch in the yarn you want to use -in stocking stitch, garter stitch, and the patterns used. Find the needle size that gives you the best looking swatch. Avoid thin and limp, you won`t like the finished product - deliberate holes are fine for airiness, but not loose stitches. Once you have made your choice, knit it again, so you have two pieces to measure. Block both pieces. Choose a 4" square in the middle of each swatch, mark the corners with pins, and carefully count stitches and rows on each. If the gods are smiling, the counts will be the same. If they are wildly different, knit another swatch and compare it to #2. Once you have a stitch and row count, divide each by 4 (or 10 if you are working in centimetres). This is the number of stitches and rows for each square on your diagram. Write out the pattern from "Cast on" onwards. For any shaping, decide how many stitches you need to increase or decrease to make the shape on your graph paper. If you are knitting a pattern, you may need to add or subtract a few stitches to fit the pattern repeat plus edge stitches. Write it all out before you begin. Then start knitting! You have designed your own pattern.
It`s your knitting so you can do whatever you want! Remember, it`s just one stitch at a time.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
6/10/2003 11:55:45 AM
Guest
Guest
Alice: I loved your message. Does this also apply to crochet? I find many patterns I just love, but call for a B hook, and I am partial to H and above. I may also want to substitute a thicker yarn, so I would have to reduce the stitches here as well.
6/10/2003 5:45:26 PM
Alice Trueman
Alice Trueman
Posts 1784
Yes, should work just as well for crocheting. Just plan it out on graph paper, and measure the yarn in your swatch. Remember that any mofif will be larger.
Alice
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