HomePrevious Website ChatElann sample skeins - what to do with them?
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5/8/2003 7:53:55 AM
Guest
Guest
I just started the elann sample skein subscription, and I`m already thinking about what to do with all of these little skeins at the end of the year. Does anyone have any ideas? Socks are an obvious solution, but I`m wondering if anyone has come up with anything really creative?
5/8/2003 11:24:09 AM
Guest
Guest
I`d be crocheting scrunchies with it, myself! That is a perfect amount to make a quick and beautiful scrunchy. Kids (and women like me with really long hair) love them and they sell extraordinarily well at bazaars. Just thinking about it makes me want to subscribe to that service! I need more yarn like I need a hole in my head, tho. LOL
5/12/2003 7:51:16 AM
Sandra D
Sandra D
Posts 4496
I save my Elann swatches & accompanying newsletter in a binder. The swatches are put in translucent three-hole pouches (the kind used to hold pencils & misc in binders). That way if new stock is ever received on a previously sold-out closeout, I still have the swatch and color samples to go back to. Being not long at knitting and new to all the fiber choices out there, I just love to go back and feel the swatches and contemplate what kind of project they could become!
5/13/2003 9:12:56 AM
Guest
Guest
Martha,
Consider making swatches that you can combine into lap afghans for your local convalescent homes or even for someone in your own family for christmas. The variety of colors and textures make the resulting afghans very unique and very beautiful. You can knit the swatches as you get the yarn or save them and do them all at the same time.
5/13/2003 11:23:48 AM
Sandra D
Sandra D
Posts 4496
Not having long hair (or any daughters, sigh!), how are scrunchies made? Are they knitted/crocheted tubes with elastic inserted in them? Are they a decorative covering for the rubber band around a pony tail? I do have a niece who is a dancer in her spare time with the seemingly requisite long hair to pull back in bun/ponytail. That would be great to present her with a box of assorted beautiful Elann scrunchies!
5/13/2003 7:58:53 PM
Guest
Guest
yes, I`m sure your niece would love it! They are easily made by crocheting ONTO an elastic. If you crochet, think of the elastic as your chain circle (like if you are crocheting a doily or something that requires a chained circle that you crochet around). There are several patterns available on line. I`ve done many of the ones at www.crochetpartners.com. I may have a couple saved on my computer if you want a pattern or two. Let me know. My daughter is a dancer and she wears my fancy scrunchies and bun holders all the time. The bun holders are gorgeous- like little hairnets that you put over a bun only crocheted. :-)
5/14/2003 7:01:23 AM
Sandra D
Sandra D
Posts 4496
Went to the site you mentioned--scrunchie patterns galore. Thanks, Tam! Should satisfy my craving for crochet. Every so often when I get tired of my current knitting project I start scouting out for something to crochet: undo my Elann knitted swatches & make crochet swatches but nothing has worked out so far for that perfect pattern/yarn combination. As far as crochet goes, do you find that certain yarn contructions work out better (i.e, cabled or tightly twisted plies)? I was crocheting a swatch with Austerman Saba and found that the fiber came untwisted quite easily and I`d have to go slower and be careful to hook all the plies. Thanks again for the heads-up on the crochet site--I`m going to have fun exploring it for my someday crochet project :-)
5/14/2003 8:27:50 AM
Guest
Guest
re: yarn constructions for crochet, I have tried ALL kinds of yarn in crochet. I was a big time crocheter for many years before learning to knit. Most yarns will work if used on the right project. Crochet always turns out bulkier than knit and uses more yarn per square inch of fabric than knitting. Dense, bulky yarns really need to be crocheted LOOSELY or you get this huge thick "rug looking" fabric. Unless I actually am making a rug, I stay away from heavy cottons. The amount of cotton that it takes to make a crochet project (a sweater for instance) gives a VERY heavy sweater so it`s best to use lightweight cotton. Cotton/acrylic blends are excellent. I have not been impressed with using those "cushy" type yarns for crochet. (the ones that have a stuffed core or look like roving) Corded cotton gives wonderful stitch definition. Wool is wonderful, of course but I don`t care for the really thick and thin ones. Crochet really wants a more consistent yarn. Fuzzy boucle yarns look wonderful in a simple stitch. They make luscious, thick but lightweight afghans in crochet! Ribbon works well if crocheted loosely. Furry eyelash yarns make a big mess, in my opinion- they look much better knitted. I`ve never used Saba but I`ve used loosely twisted yarn. You do have to keep an eye out for all the fibers. What helps with that is to use a "flat on the inside of the hook" type hook. Susan Bates hooks are like this, Boye hooks are not. I find that I get a surer and more accurate grip on the yarn with the hooks that have a flatter surface under the hook. The more "curved" ones supposedly are faster but I find that I lose more time picking up dropped loops than I gain by having the slicker surface. I also find that I split fibers a lot more often if I`m using a hook that is too small for the yarn. Have fun with your scrunchies!
5/14/2003 6:44:15 PM
Sandra D
Sandra D
Posts 4496
Thanks, Tam for the great info! My recent experience (last 2 years) in crochet has only been a potholder in Lily Sugar and Cream, and a teddy bear in Lion Brand chenille, and before that a worsted weight vest many years ago, so I really appreciate your input. I like the speed of crochet but when I look at the yarn requirements for many patterns, it does seem to take a lot compared to knitting. I came across a Leisure Arts crochet leaflet at Joanne`s called "Cool Summer Sweaters" that I`m tempted to use for my first garment. I like that the patterns in it don`t look like crochet trying to look like knitting--the cover short sleeve pullover has a lot of open work and is shown worn over a chemise. The patterns call for sport weight cotton yarn no name brand specified. So now whenever I see an Elann offering that is a sport or light DK weight yarn ,I go hmmmm..., how would that look in crochet? Anyhow, thanks again for your reply and happy crocheting or knitting, whatever you`re doing now!
5/18/2003 12:05:39 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
I think you should send them to ME! But if you think that`s a rotten idea, look for a bias pattern (Vogue Knitting had instructions on bias knitting a few years back). Group them by gauge, then by color/mood/light/dark, whatever - right now I am making a fab shell for my mother in law, and I have 10 yarns in already. The angled strip is much more flattering than a horizontal stripe, you don`t need a lot of yarn to do a row, and the variety is good for a project like this.
5/18/2003 12:15:13 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Oh, sorry, good bias instructions in in VK Winter 97/98. Another plus? The back DOES NOT have to match the front.
5/21/2003 6:26:45 AM
Guest
Guest
Bias knitting - sounds like a neat idea - I`ll look up the VK Winter issue today. I bought a huge lot of knitting magazines on eBay a while ago, and I believe I have that issue. Thanks!
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