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5/3/2003 1:21:23 PM
Guest
Guest
Pattern reads:"lst row: K8,P1 and so on.
2nd row:Knit all knit sts and purl all purl sts as they appear." I don`t understand AS THEY APPEAR. Can anyone help me. Am I just doing the reverse on the preceeding row??? Thanks so much. Cat
5/3/2003 6:04:05 PM
Guest
Guest
Hi Cat-
Yup that is what that means - You will reverse when you work for row 2. In doing so you will purl into stitches that appear as a purl on that side and knit into stitches that appear as knit stitches on that side. So it will be something like P8,K1.
Hope that makes sense!
5/3/2003 7:21:59 PM
Alice Trueman
Alice Trueman
Posts 1784
Hi Cat
Try starting by looking at an existing sweater that is knitted in stocking stitch - a machine knit one will do fine. You can tell that it is stocking stitch if the stitches on the `right side` are all like little V`s. These are KNIT stitches, have a good look at them so that you can recognize them. Now turn over to the `wrong side` and look at the stitches on this side. They`ll look like a whole lot of little bumps, rows and rows of them. Make the acquaintance of one of them as this is what PURL stitches look like. So, on row 2, if the stitch looks like a little V, knit it; if it looks like a bump, right up close to the needle, purl it. This is called "reading your knitting" and you`ll soon get on to it.
Row 2 will be K1, P8, but it`s much better to learn to read the stitches rather than following a pattern by rote. Give it a try.
Alice
Salt Spring Island
5/4/2003 10:10:54 AM
Guest
Guest
Thanks so much for the help. This new hobby is fun but I am a senior and not so quick anymore. Thanks again, and God bless
5/4/2003 10:14:19 AM
Guest
Guest
Dear Alice: Thanks for the help. I will try to learn how to read but it`s difficult. Also, the yarn I`m using is very bumpy so the individual stitches are really hard tio define. I`ll try. Thanks for the help. Cat
5/24/2003 6:38:07 AM
Fran
Fran
Posts 351
Dear Catbandy,
I have a hint that will probably not do you much good if your project is well under way, but when I`m faced with a boucle-type yarn that defies my attempts to read the stitches (either in knit or crochet), and I have had this problem, I use a "carrier" smooth yarn to define the stitches. Be forewarned that this will definitely change your gauge, but the ease of handling is idyllic. Although I haven`t tried it, and depending upon the weight of your bumpy yarn, anything down to lace weight or even crochet thread would do the trick, I think. I`ve come up with some beautiful fabrics this way in the past...
Also, if you are new to knitting and feeling tentative, may I recommend what I consider the greatest basic knitting book of all time: Elizabeth Zimmermann`s "Knitting without Tears". No nonsense, crammed with know how for beginners, and some easy, basic ideas on sweaters, hats, gloves, scarves, etc. My grandson "grew up" in his Tomten sweater!
Fran
1/2/2006 6:19:15 PM
Guest
Guest
I really need some advice. I just began knitting a month ago but am already spending every free moment knitting. I`ve been using bamboo needles but they aren`t as slippery as I`d like. I was looking at buying some single point addi turbo or a set of aeros. Any advice or suggestions?
1/2/2006 8:21:08 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
Some of the "slick" depends on what it is you are knitting-I prefer Bryspuns and Balene IIs, which aren`t that great with synthetic blends (IMHO). What do you like to knit? One needle REALLY doesn`t fit all fibers. I suggest you try a pair of Aeros. I suggest you try a pair of Balene IIs. Some people here swear by the Denise needle set, others have ditched theirs at the earliest opportunity. There`s no rule, it IS just what you like.

B
1/2/2006 8:50:02 PM
CatBookMom
CatBookMom
Posts 6264
As Bets has said, most knitters find that different yarns work best with different needle materials. I love my Denise set, and I find that their sharpish points are especially good for fuzzy yarns like Paton`s Divine, with fibers that tend to make the strands stick together. Addi Turbos are great in small sizes for socks and for smoother yarns. I tend to love my bamboo needles and start a project with them; bamboo is particularly good for very smooth cottony yarns.
1/2/2006 9:14:06 PM
bets
bets
Posts 18978
And you know, I`ve owned several sets of bamboo, I don`t prefer them-never have, I will choose Susan Bates before I pick the bamboos, they were just a bargain at the 110 yen store in Tokyo.

One caution-look hard at the tips of the needles-some are really blunt, some are fairly sharp-you may have to kiss a few frogs....;-)
1/3/2006 3:43:29 AM
Les
Les
Posts 4244
You know, a yarn store will probably let you test drive their needles. Buy a ball of yarn there and ask them if you could try out the Addi`s and compare to the others. With the right yarn, they are heaven to use!! Some yarns are too slippery for them. If price is not a concern, go for the Cadillac (or is that Lexus)!! I have many different types but of course never the right size in the right type when i need them! I have the Denise set of needles too and use them all the time. They are a set of cords with interchangeable tips so that you can start a new project without having to wait to buy the right sized needles. I really like mine. They can be used as circs or as straight because there is a stopper you can put on the end of the floppy cord. But you can do back and forth knitting with circs. You don`t have to knit in the round with them. Most people here actually prefer to knit their projects whether flat or in the round on circs.
Keep that knitting going! You`ve come to the right place!
Les
1/3/2006 5:35:36 AM
Guest
Guest
Dear Madison,
So glad that you posted and to hear that you are consumed with knitting. It only gets better. I started knitting about 4 years ago with cheap needles, just Susan Bates or whatever aluminum needles were at Wal-Mart. I`ve experimented with lots of kinds over the last several months. My favorite ones are Denises, as others have mentioned. I like bamboo circulars for sock knitting and I have one special pair of bamboo needles for knitting scarves. All my aluminum needles are still here, too. They are what I learned on and always good in a pinch. Les gave a great suggestion above, about going to the yarn store, telling them what you are looking for, and seeing what they will let you try. That`s the way to really know what works for you.

Good luck & hope everything works out! Bri
1/3/2006 6:21:07 AM
ScullyKnits
ScullyKnits
Posts 2451
I`m not much of an Addi fan, the points are too blunt for my taste. When I want slippery needles, I reach for my INOX. They are nice and fast and cost about half that of the Addis.
1/3/2006 7:32:31 AM
Guest
Guest
Since you are just starting out the Denise needled set would be a good investment. I find that they work well with most types of yarns and it is soooo handy to have several different sizes at your fingertips. When I was very new to knitting these needles allowed me to have the different sizes at my fingertips to get gauge, look at different tensions for different yarns, etc. If I didn`t have them I`d be constantly running to the store to get different sizes. Welcome to the great world of knitting and welcome here too.
1/3/2006 8:48:30 AM
Alice Trueman
Alice Trueman
Posts 1784
Aeros are good, servicable, every-day needles. I have 30 Aero circulars in my needle holder at this moment, I can see another 10 from where I am sitting at my computer, and there must be another 10 or so about the house. The points are sharp, especially on the smaller sizes. The cables are very strong - I pull loops of cable out between stitches all the time to shorten the needle, and despite dire predictions from other knitters, I have NEVER broken a cable on an Aero. Addis are blunter, more slippery, and, I think, a dream to knit with. I always use 2 Addi circulars for socks. They are fast, but do require more control from the knitter.

Alice
Salt Spring Island
1/3/2006 9:17:03 AM
Calamintha
Calamintha
Posts 563
Needle preference is one of those trial and error things. I think that is why a lot of us have soooo many needles. We always looking for the perfect one.

A lot of people love Addi Turbos. They are slick and have the best joins probably of any circs. They have two drawbacks IMO. The tips are too blunt and they are expensive. So another vote for the Inox here.

They have two lines. The Inox Express that are very similar to Addi Turbos (nickel plated) and the regular gray Inox which are teflon coated. The Inox Express are super slick and the gray fall somewhere in between. They are faster than bamboo or plastic but not as slick the Express. They cost about half of what the Addis cost. Only bad thing is Elann does not carry them :( but I can provide some other mail order sources if you are interested.
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