HomePrevious Website Chatknitting both fronts at once
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4/14/2003 10:46:23 AM
Guest
Guest
I began a vest with some Erdal yarn that I bought all in one dye-lot. However, after I used one skein, and began the next, I noticed that the dyes were CONSIDERABLY more intense in the new skein despite being the same dye lot. Anyway, I ripped the whole thing out, and proceeded to alternate smaller amounts of each skein, so it blends quite well. It`s a multi color yarn, so it just looks really really variegated.
My question is, what are some ways that both the left and right front can be knit at the same time? Because of the different colorations I`m working with skein to skein, I want to make both halves at once so that I can make sure I don`t run out of the lighter yarn before I finish both halves. If I make them both at once, I know they will each be blended equally. Has anyone ever knit the two halves as one piece and then cut it up the middle? Do you add a few extra stitches in the middle to allow for this? Or do you work separately on two sets of needles and count rows to keep both halves the same?
Thanks, Gail Hansen
Moral: Even if your yarn is the same dye lot, take it out in the daylight and look at it before you buy!
4/14/2003 6:44:31 PM
Guest
Guest
Why not just skip the seams and knit both sides along with the back (one side of the front, back, the other side of the front)? That`s how I knit cardigans. Just a thought.

Bummer about the dye lots, I would never have thought something like that could happen with machine dyed yarns. Thanks for the heads-up.
4/15/2003 7:41:34 AM
Guest
Guest
I wish I`d thought of that before I finished the back of the vest! But it`s a splendid idea, and I will have to try that next time, even if my dye lots DO match!
Thanks, Gail Hansen
4/15/2003 7:54:30 AM
Alice Trueman
Alice Trueman
Posts 1784
Steeks are used on Norwegian-style cardigans so that thebody can be knitted in the round. The principle works just fine for two fronts. Knit 5 extra stitches (for the steek) in the centre front. Then when the front is finished, run a basting thread up the centre of stitch 3 of the steek - use a high contrast. Then, go to your sewing machine, and with a fairly small straight stitch, sew TWO rows of stitching up EACH side of the steek in the middle of stitches 1 and 5. The next bit is heresy to traditional knitters, but it works - pick up stitches on the sweater sides of the machine stitching rows, and knit your bands. Now, be very brave, and cut up the front along the basting line - use sharp scissors and try to cut with confidence to keep the edges straight. Herringbone stitch down the raggedy edges, or fold the band over to cover them, and you are done. Not as scary as it sounds at first.

Alice
4/18/2003 6:41:57 AM
Guest
Guest
Thank you so much! I knew the principles of the steek method, but I wasn`t able to find such a clear explanation. I think I can do this, actually!
Gail Hansen
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